All of the above.

All of the above.

sixpenceee:

oh my god

sixpenceee:

oh my god

mrbob0822: I'll fully admit to legitimately squealing when I first saw your Loghain costume a while back. 'The Stolen Throne' really gave me an appreciation for the character that Dragon Age: Origins did not, and I thought you did a fantastic job encapsulating Loghain when Maric meets him. Keep up the wonderful work, as I am absolutely a fan of what you've achieved, especially with your craftsmanship skill and use of makeup.

Hey! Thank you SO much! Totally thrilled over here since your Alistair is the stuff of legend. (I’ve been trying to work up the guts to send you a note for ages…) Love seeing your WIP shots too, particularly your remake of the Templar sword. Are you coming to D*Con this year? If so, would love to grab a photo or two!

Bought $26 worth of jank-food for the drive tomorrow and it’s taking every scrap of will power not to have a feeding frenzy while I lie in bed, spooning with the cat and procrastinating on packing.

pastispresentdesigns:

I’ve been working on a Korra commission, and I used freezer paper for the first time to do the stenciling on the armband. I CANNOT RECOMMEND THIS ENOUGH. It was so easy— draw and cut out your stencil on the paper, iron it onto the fabric, sponge on the fabric paint. The lines are so crisp, and the paper didn’t move at all. I used to make my stencils out of regular paper and pin it down to the fabric, but this is so much better. Freezer paper, where have you been all my life?

Say what!! Totally adding this to the bag o’ tricks for fabric painting.

Because I’m on this eternal quest to pimp my current jousting kit out, I decided to pump out a set of bases before I head into the local circuit.

For some reason, between 1500 and 1545-ish, the Germans (and a few others)’ were VERY keen on armour skirting, otherwise known as ‘bases.’ You see them extensively in all sorts of art from that period. They had a tendency to make the wearer look oddly disproportionate and I don’t doubt they’ll do the same here. The armour I currently ride in is borrowed from the group I trained with and is not datable to any specific time-period. (Naturally, this horrifies my purist soul and I’m far more self-conscious about it than I should be…) BUT this does mean I have a lot of leeway to accessorize it as I see fit and so… bases.

Those aren’t properly pleated; instead, they’re individual panels sewn together with nice, deep seams. Still have to tidy up the seams with bias tape and arrange the belt holder around the top. But what else are fourteen-hour truck rides for?

We leave for our next show at arse o’ clock Wednesday morning. It’s a nice one and fun to ride. Will update as much as possible.

(Would source the images but I’ve had them on my computer for years now and cannot remember from whence they came.)

history-of-fashion:

1531 Lucas Cranach the Elder - Judith Dining with Holofernes

Always reblog the Germans. The cloak on the dude in the foreground needs to be on my body STAT.

history-of-fashion:

1531 Lucas Cranach the Elder - Judith Dining with Holofernes

Always reblog the Germans. The cloak on the dude in the foreground needs to be on my body STAT.

woopusmcdoopus:

My name is Paul and I have an obscene amount of knight images

I need a historical reference for those stirrups in that last panel like burning.

bantarleton:

This is Sefton, a warhorse of the British Household Cavalry. On July 20th 1982 an IRA bomb in Hyde Park caused 34 seperate injuries to Sefton, including a wounded left eye and a severed jugular vein. 
Sefton survived. He spent months in hospital, during which he recieved thousands of cards and mints, and one million pounds in donations, which were used to build The Sefton Wing at the Royal Veterinary College. 
Sefton returned to his duties with his regiment, and he often passed the exact spot where he had received such horrific injuries. That year he was awarded Horse of the Year, and with Pederson back in the saddle took centre stage at the Horse of the Year Show, to a standing ovation.
On 29 August 1984 Sefton retired from the Household Cavalry, and moved to the Home of Rest For Horses at Speen, Buckinghamshire where he lived to the age of 30 before having to be put down on 9 July 1993 due to incurable lameness as a complication of the injuries suffered during the bombing.

Man, right in the feels.Modern jousting is a far cry from the sort of thing the Household Cavalry face but Sefton’s story puts me in mind of some of the particularly good horses I’ve seen. In the sport, most of us are hyper-aware of how integral the horse is to a successful tournament - the best horse knows his/her job. YOUR job, as a rider, is to stay out of the way and let the horse do its thing. The selflessness and enthusiasm of these horses for their work is one of the most inspirational things about the sport. I loved the bit about Sefton walking past the place of his injury without batting an eye. Sounds like the sort of horse I would trust more than most humans!

bantarleton:

This is Sefton, a warhorse of the British Household Cavalry. On July 20th 1982 an IRA bomb in Hyde Park caused 34 seperate injuries to Sefton, including a wounded left eye and a severed jugular vein. 

Sefton survived. He spent months in hospital, during which he recieved thousands of cards and mints, and one million pounds in donations, which were used to build The Sefton Wing at the Royal Veterinary College. 

Sefton returned to his duties with his regiment, and he often passed the exact spot where he had received such horrific injuries. That year he was awarded Horse of the Year, and with Pederson back in the saddle took centre stage at the Horse of the Year Show, to a standing ovation.

On 29 August 1984 Sefton retired from the Household Cavalry, and moved to the Home of Rest For Horses at SpeenBuckinghamshire where he lived to the age of 30 before having to be put down on 9 July 1993 due to incurable lameness as a complication of the injuries suffered during the bombing.

Man, right in the feels.

Modern jousting is a far cry from the sort of thing the Household Cavalry face but Sefton’s story puts me in mind of some of the particularly good horses I’ve seen. In the sport, most of us are hyper-aware of how integral the horse is to a successful tournament - the best horse knows his/her job. YOUR job, as a rider, is to stay out of the way and let the horse do its thing. The selflessness and enthusiasm of these horses for their work is one of the most inspirational things about the sport.

I loved the bit about Sefton walking past the place of his injury without batting an eye. Sounds like the sort of horse I would trust more than most humans!

Anonymous: Not so much a question as a statement. Awesome job on the Marat ensemble. Usually Revolution-era costume tends to be very expensive. Your outfit really captured the spirit of Marat.

Hey, thanks so much! Absolutely appreciate it! It was a fun project just because he seems to have this perfect sort of… deshabille thing going on. It was interesting to figure out how to look disheveled and totally stylin’ at the same time. Thanks again!

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